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The Evolution of a Cover

So…I got my cover yesterday.  *runs around in circles like a crazy woman*  It is PERFECT.  And it is all the more perfect because of its evolution.

Let’s go back to some time last year…my editor asked me if I had any ideas for covers and I faltered.  I told her I LOVE the Penguin Classics series even though the silhouettes aren’t quite representative of the stories within.  She agreed that they’re great and instructed the designer to do girly, with a hint of nostalgia.  The first draft is to your left (click for larger version):

As you can see,

(Belated) Artsy-Fartsy Friday: Jane Eyre Covers

Ah, Jane Eyre. You have sucked up innumerable hours of my time and God knows what kind of space in my head and heart over the years.  And your covers always tend to feature bland, bleak, gray-clad governesses who don’t really point to an appealing book within.  In honor of Charlotte Brontë’s timeless classic (and as a way of announcing my intention to play along with the Brontëalong over at An Accomplished Young Lady), here are some Jane Eyre covers that won’t bore you to death (click to enlarge!):

From left to right, top to bottom:

1)  Perhaps my

Artsy-Fartsy Friday: Pride and Prejudice Covers

It’s Friday, and my Google Image Search obsession is as strong as ever.  Since Friday is a day for fun, I hereby bring you the first in a series of Friday blogs about covers of books included in The Heroine’s Bookshelf.  First installment:  Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, originally published in 1813.  Click to enlarge these gems!

Original Pride & Prejudice Cover Pride & Prejudice - Signet Edition Most Boring Pride and Prejudice Cover Ever - Macmillan Pride and Predudice - Penguin - Illustration by Reuben Toledo Marvel Pride and Prejudice Cover - by Sonny Liew Pride and Prejudice 4 - Sonny Liew Twilight P&P..aaaaahhhh!

From left to right, top to bottom:

1)  First, a bit of history.  Here’s the original front page (they didn’t do fancy artsy covers in the early 1800s).

2)  is kind of a swinging late 60sish take on P&P (reminds me